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Ricoh Apprenticeships

Ricoh Apprenticeships

Ricoh is committed to being an Apprenticeship training provider of choice.  Offering outstanding learning, support provided by our expert facilitators and coaches who are dedicated to working alongside employers to developing the skills, knowledge and behaviours of learners and provide real careers and progression opportunities.

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What is the Apprenticeship Levy?

What is the Apprenticeship Levy?

The Levy is 0.5% of payroll (including wages, bonuses and commissions), payable monthly via PAYE into an account managed through a Digital Account. The first £3m of payroll is ‘Levy free’ (like a personal tax allowance). The employer can use the money in their account to pay approved training providers for employees enrolled on approved Apprenticeships, via electronic vouchers. Vouchers that are unused 24 months after first being paid in will ‘expire’ (the Government will redirect those funds to other employers). The Digital Account will automatically use the oldest vouchers first. However, companies should be wary of delaying too long to start spending their Levy as they may struggle to use up the accumulated vouchers before they expire, potentially resulting in large losses. The Digital Account and the vouchers it issues will only be for employees who work 50% or more of their time in England. In Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland the funds will be issued to the relevant funding systems in those nations. Distribution to devolved nations is based on the home postcode of employees.

What does the Government contribute?

What does the Government contribute?

The Government also tops-up the English portion of each employer’s Levy by 10%. If employers exhaust their Levy pot in a given month, they can buy further apprenticeship training at a rate of 10p in the £1 i.e. a 90% subsidy from Government (the same set up for small employers not paying the Levy).To encourage employers and providers to continue taking on candidates who are 18 or younger, the Government pays £1,000 each to the employer and training provider for every Apprentice who is 18 or under on the day they start in two payments (at 3 months and 12 months). For businesses with fewer than 50 employees, the government also pays 100% of the costs.

Who is eligible for an Apprenticeship?

It is about looking after your talent pathways, so available to school leavers, and ‘business as usual’ hires, your leaders or graduates

Even your people with degrees are now eligible. The only requirement is that through the Apprenticeship the participant must learn “substantive new skills”, which in practice means people will not be able to do an Apprenticeship in an occupation where they have a degree (unless the Apprenticeship is at a higher level i.e. a Masters Apprenticeship).

New Apprenticeships are open to individuals aged 16 or over, including adults looking to retrain or gain a qualification in the industry in which they already work. The minimum wage for apprentices aged 16-18 is £3.50 per hour. The same applies if you’re 19 and over and in the first year of your apprenticeship, after that you are entitled to the National Minimum Wage. However, many employers pay more than this. Pay is dependent on the industry, location and type of apprenticeship.

As an apprentice you will be working alongside industry experts in a real work environment, whilst gaining the knowledge, skills and behaviours you need to succeed in your chosen career.

Why are apprenticeships good for employers?

Your workforce is central to your success. Apprentices can give your business the edge over your competitors. We provide a high-quality, rapidly growing range of apprenticeship programmes, and work closely with employers to find the right apprentice to enhance their business.

Apprenticeships offer huge advantages to your business. They are cost effective, give you access to new and talented employees who want to learn and progress and they support your skills requirements. Apprenticeships are not just about new hires, as your existing staff can also retrain or upskill, providing motivation, job satisfaction and new skills in your organisation.    

Apprenticeships provide a nationally accredited and recognised qualification and can lead to higher level progression routes. The qualification, including assessment, is attained in the workplace with minimal disruption and maximum impact. 

Our Apprenticeship Offering

Team Leader/Supervisor

Team Leader/Supervisor

A team leader/supervisor is a first line management role, with operational/project responsibilities or responsibility for managing a team to deliver a clearly defined outcome. They provide direction, instructions and guidance to ensure the achievement of set goals. Working in the private, public or third sector and in all sizes of organisation, specific responsibilities will vary, but the knowledge, skills and behaviours needed will be the same whatever the role.

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Operations/Departmental Manager

Operations/Departmental Manager

An operations/departmental manager is someone who manages teams and/or projects, and achieving operational or departmental goals and objectives, as part of the delivery of the organisations strategy. They are accountable to a more senior manager or business owner. Working in the private, public or third sector and in all sizes of organisation, specific responsibilities and job titles will vary, but the knowledge, skills and behaviours needed will be the same.

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Infrastructure Technician

Infrastructure Technician

An Infrastructure Technician provides support to internal and external customers, helping them to be productive when using technology to do their own jobs, by using tools to problem solve and troubleshoot non routine problems. The Infrastructure Technician sets people up on systems and provides support when they need it, rectifying issues to maintain the organisations productivity.

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Software Developer

Software Developer

The primary role of a software developer is to build and test simple, high-quality code across front end, logic and database layers. A developer will typically be working as part of a larger team, in which they will have responsibility for some of the straightforward elements of the overall project. The developer will need to be able to interpret design documentation and specifications. The customer requirements will typically be defined and agreed by more experienced or specialist members of the team, such as a business analyst or technical architect.
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Network Engineer

Network Engineer

The primary role of a network engineer is to design, install, maintain and support communication networks within an organisation or between organisations. Network engineers need to maintain high levels of operation of communication networks in order to provide maximum performance and availability for their users, such as staff, clients, customers and suppliers. They will understand network configuration, cloud, network administration and monitoring tools, and be able to give technical advice and guidance.

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The Apprenticeship Journey

1. Prior to starting your apprenticeship programme – we will ascertain whether you will need to complete functional skill to level 2 in Maths and English. If you are required to complete them, we will develop a bespoke plan of learning through our integrated e-portfolio platform supported by your coach.

2. 14 to 18 months on programme – a schedule of teaching, learning and support to develop the necessary knowledge, skills and behaviours to achieve your end-point assessment.

3. Gateway – the time (after 12 months) when your Line Manager, Training Provider and yourself review the on-programme journey and determine if you are ready for the on-programme assessment.

4. End point assessment – carried out by an independent end-point assessment organisation to City & Guild standards, you will need to demonstrate the required knowledge, skills and behaviours through an evidence-based portfolio, a structured interview, an employer reference.

What you will learn

By the end of your Apprenticeship Programme you will have compounded your existing knowledge and skills as an Infrastructure technician and developed some core attributes such as:

  • Understand maintenance process and apply them to your work 
  • Working knowledge of a range of cabling and connectivity
  • Understand and apply the basic elements and architecture of computer systems
  • Understand where to apply the relevant numerical skills and relevant networking skills necessary to maintain a secure network
  • Understands the similarities, differences and benefits of the current Operating Systems available
  • Understands how to operate remotely, deploy and securely integrate mobile devices
  • Understanding and working knowledge of Cloud and Cloud Services
  • Understands the importance of disaster recovery and how a disaster recovery plan works and their role within it
  • Understands the similarities and differences between a range of coding and logic
  • Understands and complies with business processes
  • Working knowledge of business IT skills relevant to the organisation. Logical and creative thinking skills
Behaviours and Skills
Logical and creative thinking skills; Analytical and problem solving skills; Ability to work independently and to take responsibility; use own initiative; A thorough and organised approach; Ability to work with a range of internal and external people; Ability to communicate effectively in a variety of situations.

Modules to be completed

  1. Networking and Architecture
  2. Mobile and Operating Systems
  3. Cloud Services
  4. Coding and Logic
  5. Business processes